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Measles in Auckland

UPDATE: As at 2PM, 26 April there have been 27 confirmed cases of measles this year
Fact sheets on measles  |  Latest measles news


Measles is a highly infectious viral illness that can be very serious. In the resources below, you'll find information on what symptoms to look out for, how to best protect yourself and others, as well as what actions to take if you've been in contact with someone with measles. 

If you are concerned about measles call Healthline on 0800 611 116 or call your GP.
Please do not just turn up to your GP, after hours or emergency department as you could potentially infect others.

Measles is spread through the air, by sneezing or coughing. You only need to be in a room for a few minutes to spread or catch the measles virus through breathing. People are infectious with measles five days before they feel sick. This means you can spread it to other people five days before your symptoms appear.

You usually start to feel unwell 10–14 days after you have caught the virus. You are likely to get a fever, cough, runny nose, sore and watery pink eyes and sometimes small white spots inside your mouth. At around day three to seven you will get a blotchy rash. This rash first appears on your face and then spreads to your head and body. It can last for up to a week.

People with measles can spread it to others five days before and until five days after their rash appears.

Measles is caused by a virus, so antibiotics won’t cure it. If you or your child has measles, stay away from others until at least five days after the rash appears. This means not going to daycare, school, work or anywhere there are others you could pass measles onto, and don’t have people visit you at home.

Let people you have been in contact with know that you have measles so that they can take appropriate steps to protect themselves and their family.

If you are concerned about measles call Healthline on 0800 611 116 or call your GP. Please do not just turn up to your GP, after hours or emergency department as you could potentially infect others.

 

Measles is a notifiable disease. This means that health professionals or laboratories will inform us when someone has it. This allows us to monitor the number of people who have the disease and give them and health professionals advice on how to reduce the spread of measles. Our team will also speak to the person who has measles about who they have been in close contact with so we can provide those people with advice to help protect themselves and avoid spreading it further.  

Measles is spread through the air, by sneezing or coughing. You only need to be in a room for a few minutes to spread or catch the measles virus through breathing. People are infectious with measles five days before they feel sick. This means you can spread it to other people five days before your symptoms appear.

You usually start to feel unwell 10–14 days after you have caught the virus. You are likely to get a fever, cough, runny nose, sore and watery pink eyes and sometimes small white spots inside your mouth. At around day three to seven you will get a blotchy rash. This rash first appears on your face and then spreads to your head and body. It can last for up to a week.

People with measles can spread it to others five days before and until five days after their rash appears.

Measles is caused by a virus, so antibiotics won’t cure it. If you or your child has measles, stay away from others until at least five days after the rash appears. This means not going to daycare, school, work or anywhere there are others you could pass measles onto, and don’t have people visit you at home.

Let people you have been in contact with know that you have measles so that they can take appropriate steps to protect themselves and their family.

If you are concerned about measles call Healthline on 0800 611 116 or call your GP. Please do not just turn up to your GP, after hours or emergency department as you could potentially infect others.

 

Measles is a notifiable disease. This means that health professionals or laboratories will inform us when someone has it. This allows us to monitor the number of people who have the disease and give them and health professionals advice on how to reduce the spread of measles. Our team will also speak to the person who has measles about who they have been in close contact with so we can provide those people with advice to help protect themselves and avoid spreading it further.  

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HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

There are specific requirements for notifiable diseases in the Auckland region.

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AUCKLAND MEASLES CASES: 27

Auckland Regional Public Health Service (ARPHS) has been notified of another six new measles cases, taking the number of confirmed cases in Auckland for this year to 27. Medical Officer of...

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AUCKLAND MEASLES CASES: 21

Auckland Regional Public Health Service (ARPHS) has been notified of another four new measles cases, taking the number of confirmed cases in Auckland for this year to 21. Medical Officer of...

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Last updated 26.04.2019

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