search
Auckland Regional Public Health Service helps manage the potential spread of diseases of public health concern brought into the country by international travellers.

Modern global travel means disease can be spread quickly around the world. This means having systems in place to check entry points into New Zealand to reduce harm to people and the environment.

New Zealand is a signatory to the World Health Organization’s International Health Regulations 2005. These regulations aim to protect public health, and minimise the international spread of infectious disease. Under these regulations, the illness of passengers must be reported to health authorities.

The International Health Regulations 2005 require that all international flights must report before landing to advise if there is any illness aboard. If there is illness aboard that could be of public health significance, Auckland Regional Public Health Service carries out a risk assessment based on information from the plane, airline, Auckland International Airport, other border agencies, and St. John Ambulance.

If necessary, the person who is ill can be placed under observation for a period of time after arrival to make sure they are not at risk of passing on an illness to others.

The International Health Regulations 2005 require that all international vessels have a Ship Sanitation Certificate. These certificates provide evidence that public health authorities have inspected the ship, there is no evidence of significant infection amongst passengers or crew, and any vectors found have been eliminated. A vector is an animal or insect species that enables spread of certain diseases to humans.

If someone on board a boat is ill, the boat can be inspected and, on rare occasions, people may be quarantined (put into isolation) if their illness poses a threat to the health of New Zealanders.

The International Health Regulations 2005 require that all international flights must report before landing to advise if there is any illness aboard. If there is illness aboard that could be of public health significance, Auckland Regional Public Health Service carries out a risk assessment based on information from the plane, airline, Auckland International Airport, other border agencies, and St. John Ambulance.

If necessary, the person who is ill can be placed under observation for a period of time after arrival to make sure they are not at risk of passing on an illness to others.

The International Health Regulations 2005 require that all international vessels have a Ship Sanitation Certificate. These certificates provide evidence that public health authorities have inspected the ship, there is no evidence of significant infection amongst passengers or crew, and any vectors found have been eliminated. A vector is an animal or insect species that enables spread of certain diseases to humans.

If someone on board a boat is ill, the boat can be inspected and, on rare occasions, people may be quarantined (put into isolation) if their illness poses a threat to the health of New Zealanders.

HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

There are specific requirements for notifiable diseases in the Auckland region.

read-more READ MORE

Last updated 29.11.2018

FOR NOTIFICATIONS OR QUERIES, CALL US ON 09 623 4600
MENU menu-arrow
Public
health topics