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Measles is a highly infectious viral illness, that can be very serious. It is prevented by the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination.

Measles is caused by a virus and is easily spread from person to person. Both children and adults can get measles, and it can be very serious. A third of people with measles get ear infections, pneumonia (an infection in the lungs), or diarrhoea (loose, watery poo). Very bad cases of measles need treatment in hospital and some people can die from measles.

Your family/whānau’s best protection against measles is to be immunised against it. Protection from measles is part of the free MMR vaccinations given to children at 15 months and four years of age. If you think you or your child may not have had these vaccinations, see your doctor.

If you are concerned about measles call Healthline on 0800 611 116 or see your doctor or practice nurse.

Measles is spread through the air, by sneezing or coughing. You only need to be in a room for a few minutes to spread or catch the measles virus through breathing. People are infectious with measles five days before they feel sick. This means you can spread it to other people five days before your symptoms appear.

You usually start to feel unwell 10–14 days after you have caught the virus. You are likely to get a fever, cough, runny nose, sore and watery pink eyes and sometimes small white spots inside your mouth. At around day three to seven you will get a blotchy rash. This rash first appears on your face and then spreads to your head and body. It can last for up to a week.

People with measles can spread it to others five days before and until five days after their rash appears.

Measles is caused by a virus, so antibiotics won’t cure it. If you or your child has measles, stay away from others until at least five days after the rash appears. This means not going to daycare, school, work or anywhere there are others you could pass measles onto, and don’t have people visit you at home.

Let people you have been in contact with know that you have measles so that they can take appropriate steps to protect themselves and their family.

Measles is a notifiable disease. This means that health professionals or laboratories will inform us when someone has it. This allows us to monitor the number of people who have the disease and give them and health professionals advice on how to reduce the spread of measles. Our team will also speak to the person who has measles about who they have been in close contact with so we can provide those people with advice to help protect themselves and avoid spreading it further.  

 

Information in other languages

  • Fact sheet - Measles PDF (ARPHS)

Tongan

  • Fact sheet - Information for contacts PDF (ARPHS)

Tongan

Measles is spread through the air, by sneezing or coughing. You only need to be in a room for a few minutes to spread or catch the measles virus through breathing. People are infectious with measles five days before they feel sick. This means you can spread it to other people five days before your symptoms appear.

You usually start to feel unwell 10–14 days after you have caught the virus. You are likely to get a fever, cough, runny nose, sore and watery pink eyes and sometimes small white spots inside your mouth. At around day three to seven you will get a blotchy rash. This rash first appears on your face and then spreads to your head and body. It can last for up to a week.

People with measles can spread it to others five days before and until five days after their rash appears.

Measles is caused by a virus, so antibiotics won’t cure it. If you or your child has measles, stay away from others until at least five days after the rash appears. This means not going to daycare, school, work or anywhere there are others you could pass measles onto, and don’t have people visit you at home.

Let people you have been in contact with know that you have measles so that they can take appropriate steps to protect themselves and their family.

Measles is a notifiable disease. This means that health professionals or laboratories will inform us when someone has it. This allows us to monitor the number of people who have the disease and give them and health professionals advice on how to reduce the spread of measles. Our team will also speak to the person who has measles about who they have been in close contact with so we can provide those people with advice to help protect themselves and avoid spreading it further.  

 

Information in other languages

  • Fact sheet - Measles PDF (ARPHS)

Tongan

  • Fact sheet - Information for contacts PDF (ARPHS)

Tongan

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HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

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MEASLES ALERT FOR TRAVELLERS FROM PHILIPPINES

Auckland Regional Public Health Service (ARPHS) has been notified of a new case of measles and is asking people who may have come in contact with that person to watch...

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Last updated 20.11.2018

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